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Friday, December 21, 2012

Konya

Konya
Konya
Konya was inhabited during the Late Copper Age around 3000 BC. It under the authority of the Hittites around 1500 BC. These were overtaken by the Sea Peoples around 1200 BC. The Phrygians set up their kingdom in central Anatolia in the 8th century BC. Xenophon describes Iconium (Konya) as the last city of Phrygia. The region was overwhelmed by Cimmerian invaders c. 690 BC. It was later part of the Persian Empire, until Darius III was defeated by Alexander the Great in 333 BC. Alexanders empire broke up shortly after his death and the town came under the rule of Seleucus I Nicator. During the Hellenistic period the town was ruled by the kings of Pergamon. As Attalus III, the last king of Pergamon, was about to die without an heir, he bequeathed his kingdom to Rome. Under the rule of emperor Claudius, the citys name was changed to Claudioconium, and during the rule of emperor Hadrianus to Colonia Aelia Hadriana.

The city was filled with refugees from the Khwarezmid Empire fleeing the advance of the Mongol Empire at 1220s, Sultan Alā al-Dīn Kayqubā equipped the town and built a palace on top of the citadel. In 1228 he invited Bahaeddin Veled and his son Mevlana (Rumi), the founder of the Mevlevi order, to settle in Konya. Mevlana, simply as Rumi in English-speaking world, was a 13th-century Persian Muslim poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic. Iranians, Turks, Afghans, Tajiks, and other Central Asian Muslims as well as the Muslims of the Indians have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy in the past seven centuries. Rumi's importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders. His poems have been widely translated into many of the world's languages and transposed into various formats. He was described as the most popular poet in America in 2007.

Read More: http://www.booktravelturkey.com

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